Muahahahaha. Welp.

(via yourelaughingbutimserious)

feelin’ schmancy.

feelin’ schmancy.

karnythia:

sourcedumal:

darkmoonperfume:

bcauseican:

christel-thoughts:

peachringsandshinythings:

jas0nwaterfalls:

a discussion we had in WLC concerning women.

What got me was the fact that the two black girls couldn’t fathom being chosen first.

:/

"It seems like preferences are okay as long as it’s not Black women. But then it’s also not okay for Black women to have preferences other than Black men."

Wow

But why is anyone surprised though? Everyday you get the same message that a black woman is not beautiful, is not special, is not anything. The whole world shits on black women and we at the bottom of the rung when it comes to everything and that includes love and appreciation.

Ok I finally watched this, and it just goes to show that Black women are truly juxtaposed as the ultimate un woman. We are hated and disparaged and not allowed to be seen as beautiful.

This shit would happen often on the site that I would frequent for asian men. Black women ignored and deemed ugly despite the asian men on that site decrying the racism they face in the dating world

And the fact that the black girls said he was lyin is straight up internalized white supremacy

My husband prefers Black women & has never seriously dated outside of his race. I dated (and married at one point) outside of mine. I spent years being told black men wouldn’t want me, only to catch hell from black men for dating non black men. Meanwhile my husband got all kinds of shit when we got together because people assumed he needed to date non black women to find happiness. Having been there? I assure a lack of blackness isn’t remotely a guarantee of happiness,

freshmouthgoddess:

essence-of-ebony:

tintomatotop:

yinx1:

teflonwonton:

yinx1:

locsgirl:

thefemalegoonie:

eriannny:

reflectionof1:

MODERNITY IN SHAPING THE STATUS OF AFRICA Both Cost 150,000 US Dollars.

gtfohhhhhhhh

Soo does a man come with the Nigerian house or nah?

Dang

Man usually comes with the house but there are some for the single lady’s.
Seriously our house in Lagos is about this big. America doesn’t know jack about “third world” countries.

errrr… yah. but then you wake up and you’re in Africa.. its not just about the square footage or amenities of a home but you must consider the neighborhood.. do i feel safe with who is living next door? is there clean, running water? is there wildlife to be concerned with? what are the roads like? and seriously most importantly DO I HAVE HIGH SPEED INTERNET. I AM NOT DOWNGRADING TO 56K. NEVER AGAIN

Okay, so I see I need to give a geography lesson, let’s see if I can say this humanly

1. The OP said Nigeria NOT “Africa”
2. “Consider the neighborhood”? What kind of IS is that?! People are PEOPLE wherever you go. You have your rich you have your poor. You have your smarts, and you have people like you that spout IS. 
3. Seriously, roads?
 
THIS IS LAGOS, NIGERIA HIGHWAYS…Looks a lot like LA…HMMM.

4. Wildlife? We have wildlife in the states; bears, deer, my mother saw a coyote outside her office window and she works 20 minutes away from downtown. What are you suggesting?
5. Lastly this is the stupidest thing. Internet. Is it not the Nigerians coning your gullible American asses out of your life savings. So much you it has cause alarm, and has government protocol so your stupid grandmother does send her savings thinking she can get rich quick. I think Nigeria has Internet and HIGH SPEED under control
I suggest you read, adsorb, learn and apply. Before spouting off about “Africa” again. =_=


TELL ‘EM 

Lmao they said “.. do i feel safe with who is living next door? ”
Nigga I’m black in America! Ain’t nothing safe about that! ignorance and hatred is everywhere but I’d still take my chances in Nigeria!

white people. you’re the only people who is safe anywhere in the world … reminds me of this Haitian french dude saying that since he’s been back in Haiti he can finally breath in peace.. cause no white cops … he feels safe … since in forever …. and Haiti has it’s problem … but the guys feels safer here than France…so yeah

freshmouthgoddess:

essence-of-ebony:

tintomatotop:

yinx1:

teflonwonton:

yinx1:

locsgirl:

thefemalegoonie:

eriannny:

reflectionof1:

MODERNITY IN SHAPING THE STATUS OF AFRICA
Both Cost 150,000 US Dollars.

gtfohhhhhhhh

Soo does a man come with the Nigerian house or nah?

Dang

Man usually comes with the house but there are some for the single lady’s.

Seriously our house in Lagos is about this big. America doesn’t know jack about “third world” countries.

errrr… yah. but then you wake up and you’re in Africa.. its not just about the square footage or amenities of a home but you must consider the neighborhood.. do i feel safe with who is living next door? is there clean, running water? is there wildlife to be concerned with? what are the roads like? and seriously most importantly DO I HAVE HIGH SPEED INTERNET. I AM NOT DOWNGRADING TO 56K. NEVER AGAIN

Okay, so I see I need to give a geography lesson, let’s see if I can say this humanly

1. The OP said Nigeria NOT “Africa”

2. “Consider the neighborhood”? What kind of IS is that?! People are PEOPLE wherever you go. You have your rich you have your poor. You have your smarts, and you have people like you that spout IS. 

3. Seriously, roads?

 

THIS IS LAGOS, NIGERIA HIGHWAYS…Looks a lot like LA…HMMM.

4. Wildlife? We have wildlife in the states; bears, deer, my mother saw a coyote outside her office window and she works 20 minutes away from downtown. What are you suggesting?

5. Lastly this is the stupidest thing. Internet. Is it not the Nigerians coning your gullible American asses out of your life savings. So much you it has cause alarm, and has government protocol so your stupid grandmother does send her savings thinking she can get rich quick. I think Nigeria has Internet and HIGH SPEED under control

I suggest you read, adsorb, learn and apply. Before spouting off about “Africa” again. =_=

TELL ‘EM 

Lmao they said “.. do i feel safe with who is living next door? ”

Nigga I’m black in America! Ain’t nothing safe about that! ignorance and hatred is everywhere but I’d still take my chances in Nigeria!

white people. you’re the only people who is safe anywhere in the world … reminds me of this Haitian french dude saying that since he’s been back in Haiti he can finally breath in peace.. cause no white cops … he feels safe … since in forever …. and Haiti has it’s problem … but the guys feels safer here than France…so yeah

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

gradientlair:

This is beautiful. [X]

I love this!

Ready for my recital, lol.

Ready for my recital, lol.

THIS.

(via liveshiv)

Do not try to be pretty. You weren’t meant to be pretty; you were meant to burn down the earth and graffiti the sky. Don’t let anyone ever simplify you to just “pretty.”
Things I Wish My Mother Had Taught Me | d.a.s    (via barbieandken)

(via liveshiv)

zinge:

feministballerina:

malonetaylor:

Did you know? It’s your RIGHT to access reproductive healthcare without being intimidated or terrorized.

People need to see this. 

It is illegal to willingly harass and intimidate a person on purpose, even if you are doing it outside of an abortion clinic.  Remember this, pro-lifers.  You can and will be charged. <3

zinge:

feministballerina:

malonetaylor:

Did you know? It’s your RIGHT to access reproductive healthcare without being intimidated or terrorized.

People need to see this. 

It is illegal to willingly harass and intimidate a person on purpose, even if you are doing it outside of an abortion clinic.  Remember this, pro-lifers.  You can and will be charged. <3

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

descendants-of-brown-royalty:

Identity of the African Diaspora: An Evolution of Identifying Terms
The terms used to describe members of the African Diaspora have evolved throughout the last couple of centuries. Identities have taken shape often based on the region in which African descendants currently live. The majority of people, who used to be categorized solely as ‘black’, are in search of a term which identifies them as people who are part of a larger culture and not one that necessarily reflects their race and skin color. The modern debate over an identifying name took shape during the African slave trade when the first Africans were shipped to the Americas and the Caribbean. The vast majority of Africans wanted to be referred to as African. However the non-African population referred to Africans either as slaves or free. Thus began the reference to people as an adjective and not a noun. Soon Africans and African descendants rejected the term ‘African’ because a negative connotation evolved through the ideas of European descendants. ‘African’ came to symbolize a sub-human identity because Africans were seen as ‘barbaric’ and ‘ape-like’. With the end of the nineteenth century, adjectives started to transform into nouns as identifying terms for African descendants. The term ‘Colored’ became customary when describing all people who were ‘non-white’. However this was replaced with the term ‘Negro’ in the early twentieth century due to the fact that segregation was on a rise and signs above public facilities appeared all over the United States indicating which facility could be used by the ‘Colored’ or by the ‘Whites’. Segregation fueled racism and the terms, ‘Colored’ and ‘Negro’, were perceived as racist by the time of the 1950s and 60s’ Civil Rights Movement. Currently the only acceptable use of the term ‘Colored’ is in the organizational title of the NAACP (the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People). In the 1960s many African Americans were rediscovering their African roots. Hairstyles such as the Afro were becoming popular and slogans such as ‘Black is Beautiful’ were chanted by many. “Say It Loud: I’m Black and I’m Proud”, was a song by James Brown which demonstrated the rise of ‘Black Pride’ in the 1960s. With this rise of Black awareness, the distinction on who was ‘Black’ changed. Although ‘Black’ still referred to the color of one’s skin, now it referred only to African descendants and no longer encompassed dark-skinned individuals such as Italians or Mexicans. However, this remained problematic because it referred to anyone originating from African descendants, such as people from the Caribbean, even though these possessed a highly distinct culture. Not all African descendants welcomed the surfacing of the term ‘Black’ because they felt it was similar to the term ‘Negro’ which was now seen as a racist term. But for the most part many accepted the term ‘Black’ and it is still considered acceptable in the USA and other parts of the world today. The term ‘Afro-American’ developed during the rise of hyphenated terms to describe American minority groups in the 1970s and 1980s. Soon the term evolved into ‘African-American’ and finally into ‘African American’ with it losing the hyphen. The hyphen was removed because many believed that it implied a sub-category. ‘African American’ was adopted quickly by many because many African descendants in the USA did not identify themselves as ‘Black’. However, this terminology does not satisfy everyone because many also believe that there is nothing African about them. It is now widely accepted as the politically correct terminology for Americans of African descendant although it is understood that one term cannot contain all the information required to accurately represent a population of over forty million people. Today, members of the African Diaspora associate themselves with Africa through the terms with which they identify. Many African descendants believe that the usage of ‘African’ when being identified is a way of circling back to their roots of Africa which carried a stigma for a long time. When polled by the online Village forum associated with the Blacknet website, 40% of African descendants living in Great Britain wished to be called African British while almost half that number, 24%, wished to be called Black. Many believe that the English language has oppressed African people by constantly using adjectives instead of nouns when referring to an ethnic group. With the desire to be recognized and connected with their heritage and not described according to their skin color, many prefer the reference to Africa when identifying them. Afro-Latinos acknowledge their black identity but do not accept it as a means of identification. Although many people would expect Afro-Dominicans to share the same level of identification with blackness as African Americans do, many Afro-Dominicans believe that being black places them into the same social category which African Americans associate with racism and discrimination. Afro-Latinos in the USA also do not identify with the African Americans. For many Afro-Latinos, African American means that someone is born in the USA with African ancestry and not Hispanic heritage. However, the longer an Afro-Latino remains in the USA, the more likely he/she will identify him/herself as being black just like the African American. These diversities and complexities pertinent to members of the African Diaspora make it difficult to claim a common identity. Although many share broad similarities, African descendants do not believe these similarities are enough to associate all under the same umbrella. Every region of the world that African descendants live in has unique aspects for understanding the logic behind the terminology desired by them. History, culture, and political institutions have all been factors which have shaped racial identities throughout the world.
descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

descendants-of-brown-royalty:

Identity of the African Diaspora: An Evolution of Identifying Terms

The terms used to describe members of the African Diaspora have evolved throughout the last couple of centuries. Identities have taken shape often based on the region in which African descendants currently live. The majority of people, who used to be categorized solely as ‘black’, are in search of a term which identifies them as people who are part of a larger culture and not one that necessarily reflects their race and skin color. 

The modern debate over an identifying name took shape during the African slave trade when the first Africans were shipped to the Americas and the Caribbean. The vast majority of Africans wanted to be referred to as African. However the non-African population referred to Africans either as slaves or free. Thus began the reference to people as an adjective and not a noun. Soon Africans and African descendants rejected the term ‘African’ because a negative connotation evolved through the ideas of European descendants. ‘African’ came to symbolize a sub-human identity because Africans were seen as ‘barbaric’ and ‘ape-like’. With the end of the nineteenth century, adjectives started to transform into nouns as identifying terms for African descendants. The term ‘Colored’ became customary when describing all people who were ‘non-white’. However this was replaced with the term ‘Negro’ in the early twentieth century due to the fact that segregation was on a rise and signs above public facilities appeared all over the United States indicating which facility could be used by the ‘Colored’ or by the ‘Whites’. Segregation fueled racism and the terms, ‘Colored’ and ‘Negro’, were perceived as racist by the time of the 1950s and 60s’ Civil Rights Movement. Currently the only acceptable use of the term ‘Colored’ is in the organizational title of the NAACP (the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People). 

In the 1960s many African Americans were rediscovering their African roots. Hairstyles such as the Afro were becoming popular and slogans such as ‘Black is Beautiful’ were chanted by many. “Say It Loud: I’m Black and I’m Proud”, was a song by James Brown which demonstrated the rise of ‘Black Pride’ in the 1960s. With this rise of Black awareness, the distinction on who was ‘Black’ changed. Although ‘Black’ still referred to the color of one’s skin, now it referred only to African descendants and no longer encompassed dark-skinned individuals such as Italians or Mexicans. However, this remained problematic because it referred to anyone originating from African descendants, such as people from the Caribbean, even though these possessed a highly distinct culture. Not all African descendants welcomed the surfacing of the term ‘Black’ because they felt it was similar to the term ‘Negro’ which was now seen as a racist term. But for the most part many accepted the term ‘Black’ and it is still considered acceptable in the USA and other parts of the world today. 

The term ‘Afro-American’ developed during the rise of hyphenated terms to describe American minority groups in the 1970s and 1980s. Soon the term evolved into ‘African-American’ and finally into ‘African American’ with it losing the hyphen. The hyphen was removed because many believed that it implied a sub-category. ‘African American’ was adopted quickly by many because many African descendants in the USA did not identify themselves as ‘Black’. However, this terminology does not satisfy everyone because many also believe that there is nothing African about them. It is now widely accepted as the politically correct terminology for Americans of African descendant although it is understood that one term cannot contain all the information required to accurately represent a population of over forty million people. 

Today, members of the African Diaspora associate themselves with Africa through the terms with which they identify. Many African descendants believe that the usage of ‘African’ when being identified is a way of circling back to their roots of Africa which carried a stigma for a long time. When polled by the online Village forum associated with the Blacknet website, 40% of African descendants living in Great Britain wished to be called African British while almost half that number, 24%, wished to be called Black. Many believe that the English language has oppressed African people by constantly using adjectives instead of nouns when referring to an ethnic group. With the desire to be recognized and connected with their heritage and not described according to their skin color, many prefer the reference to Africa when identifying them. 

Afro-Latinos acknowledge their black identity but do not accept it as a means of identification. Although many people would expect Afro-Dominicans to share the same level of identification with blackness as African Americans do, many Afro-Dominicans believe that being black places them into the same social category which African Americans associate with racism and discrimination. Afro-Latinos in the USA also do not identify with the African Americans. For many Afro-Latinos, African American means that someone is born in the USA with African ancestry and not Hispanic heritage. However, the longer an Afro-Latino remains in the USA, the more likely he/she will identify him/herself as being black just like the African American. 

These diversities and complexities pertinent to members of the African Diaspora make it difficult to claim a common identity. Although many share broad similarities, African descendants do not believe these similarities are enough to associate all under the same umbrella. Every region of the world that African descendants live in has unique aspects for understanding the logic behind the terminology desired by them. History, culture, and political institutions have all been factors which have shaped racial identities throughout the world.

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

Dressed for Summer since Spring is on vacation til next week.

Dressed for Summer since Spring is on vacation til next week.

So for generations in the mind of America, the Negro has been more of a formula than a human being—a something to be argued about, condemned or defended, to be “kept down,” or “in his place,” or “‘helped up,” to be worried with or worried over, harassed or patronized, a social bogey or a social burden. The thinking Negro even has been induced to share this same general attitude, to focus his attention on controversial issues, to see himself in the distorted perspective of a social problem.
Alain Locke (via readinthenameofyourlord)

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

dentellesetfroufrous:

Spun Gold Set by La Fée Verte

I want!

dentellesetfroufrous:

Spun Gold Set by La Fée Verte

I want!

(via liveshiv)

complex /adj., –adjective

so complicated or intricate as to be hard to understand or deal with

thoughtful //
creative //
destructive //
cruel //

"Tawbut nee Gunci Mundo.
Tawbut nee tukenig kah weous.
Mundo Wigo."

Thank you, Great Spirit.
Thank you for bread and meat.
The Creator is good."

twitter.com/complexitiiiiii

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